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 The Trek: The Journals

•
Team: North
Ravindra Gupta
Thursday, August 8
Lightning Injuries
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Dr. Ravindra Gupta contemplating how to better help patients near the Avalanche River gorge in Glacier National Park

Dr. Ravindra Gupta contemplating how to better help patients near the Avalanche River gorge in Glacier National Park
Courtesy Michelle Williams

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The three support team members are enjoying the lake.

The three support team members are enjoying the lake.

KOA, West Glacier

Today Michelle, Cheryl, and I went on a hike through Avalanche Lake, in the Glacier National Forrest. Thankfully we had time off today after a rough couple days of support team work. Also the trek team is outfitted now so all the trekkers medical problems will be taken care of. Time for some R&R!

As you can see in the pictures, the view at Avalanche Lake is magnificent. As we were hiking through the woods a sudden thunder storm emerged. It was quite queer, a bright sunny day turning into stormy weather, but I actually enjoyed it just as much. In fact I went down to the gorge of Avalanche River and watched the water current pick up as it started to rain. Very interesting.

Today I will concentrate on lightning injuries since it was possible that this could occur on the lake today. Lighting strikes can measure 30 million volts, with up to 30 strokes in a lightning flash. The main stroke measures about 2-3 inches and the temperature can range up to 4 times as hot as the sun! Charlie Thorpe also told me today that the longest lightning bolt was measured at 97 miles horizontally. There are several complications to lightning strikes, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, neurologic injury, contusions, fractures, popped ear drums and burns. The treatment varies; it is based on the complications. Basically if you witness somebody get struck by lightning, support them (CPR, splints, etc.) and transfer them to a medical facility immediately. Also don’t worry about touching somebody after the strike, they are not charged.

Avoidance is the best measure, and one can do this several ways. Seek shelter in a building or automobile, stay as far away from metal poles (such as in a tent) as possible, move away from open water, move away from trees. The worst thing to do is stand in the middle of a lake, with a large metal pole in your hand, next to a large tree, while there is lightning outside.

If your hair stands on end, hear crackling noises, or you feel “charged” you man be involved in a lighting strike. Leave the area immediately, if you can’t, crouch down on the balls of your feet and tuck your head down. Do not touch the ground with your hands.

I hope this helps!
for Thursday, August 8
North South Both




Biographical
•
Team: North
Ravindra Gupta
Dr. Ravindra Gupta enjoying a moment of well-deserved rest.

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List of All Journal Entries
•
Thursday, August 15
Ravindra Gupta
Horses
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Monday, August 12
Ravindra Gupta
Shooting Stars
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Saturday, August 10
Ravindra Gupta
The Highline trail - Glacier National Forest
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Friday, August 9
Ravindra Gupta
Support Errands
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Thursday, August 8
Ravindra Gupta
Lightning Injuries
   >> more...

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Tuesday, August 6
Ravindra Gupta
Blisters and Hot Spots
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Friday, August 2
Ravindra Gupta
Camping in Glacier National Park
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•
Thursday, August 1
Ravindra Gupta
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Monday, July 29
Ravindra Gupta
Journal Entry
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