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 The Trek: The Journals

•
Team: South
Bob Hammond
Tuesday, August 20
The First 21 Days
We have been on the trail now for 18 days. Trekkers are tired from many arduous days of climbing and often crawling up sheer rock faces, or spending time ensuring they do not cross private land and in the process often creating more ground travel for themselves. It has been hot in the daytime, often with torrential rains in the afternoon.

Our days start at about 6 or 6:30 am with a quick breakfast, then the trekkers need to break camp and pack their tents and stow their gear, prepare the items they need for the day and then hit the trail. Meanwhile the support team prepares the meals, pack up their own personal gear and then break camp and often move it a hundred miles. If any support team member wants to join the trekkers on that segment I try to accommodate them but since we have one vehicle per support team member, that often translated into a vehicle shuttle situation and very long day driving to the next camp site. When the support team arrives at the camp site their work starts again.

The technical support from Earth Analytic continues to be a critical component of the trek and the support they are providing can best be descried as “heroic”. We continue to learn what the individual route maps must contain to be of maximum utility to the trek team on the ground. Notably we have discovered that in addition the GPS tracks we need the longitude and latitude of critical boundaries listed on the map so the trek team can find suitable ground navigation solutions to the puzzles they are presented with. Often the trek path is superimposed over an existing feature, like a road and it is not possible to see route or trail numbers so Forest Service road or trail identifications or even local route identifications need to be added to the maps so the trekers can validate decisions and locations and increase their comfort levels.

Challenge, difficulty, whatever word is used to describe what we are asked to overcome daily, in the totality of the journey they are only little speed bumps in a huge expansive parking lot. The grandeur of the lands, the experiences with the people we meet, the far reaching impact we know our journey will have on our public lands legacy makes these challenges fade far into the background.

for Tuesday, August 20
North South Both




Biographical
•
Team: South
Bob Hammond
Bob puts in a late night working out the maps for Team South

   >> more...



List of All Journal Entries
•
Sunday, September 15
Bob Hammond
THE DAY OFF or “VACATION?”
   >> more...

•
Saturday, September 7
Bob Hammond
An Update
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, August 20
Bob Hammond
The First 21 Days
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, July 31
Bob Hammond
   >> more...








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