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 The Trek: The Journals

•
Team: South
Catherine Kiffe
Saturday, August 24
Trees, more or less?
Saturday, August 24, Saturday, August 24, 2002 Trees, more or less?

Part of the mission of the Trek is for the Trekkers to gather information to share with the American public on issues concerning public lands. Officials from different agencies and universities planned programs and have been eager for us to hear their stories, their views, their understanding of the care of public lands.
This morning we met at Northern Arizona University with Dennis Lund, retired forest service district ranger, as moderator. His opening comments reminded us that "What's happening today is the result of 100 years of policies". One of the biggest and most urgent issues is centered on Urban Interface problems, where families are moving into areas close to the forests and the danger of fires is paramount.
We heard from Jim Golden, Forest Supervisor for Coconina County, the second biggest county in the state of Arizona. His passion showed as he spoke about the complexities of management for forest health to prevent catastrophic events, to leave a legacy of healthy trees for future generations. With ever increasing size of fires in unnatural conditions ---"What do you do?". So many things come into play----science, economics, values, social issues, and politics. Combined, these can become a fire storm of their own. One scientific method would be to thin the forest, to resemble more natural conditions. It costs a considerable amount of money to accomplish this on 100,000 acres of land. Economically if a use could be found for the small logs harvested the project could help pay for part of the project. Sometimes the logs are burned; carbon is release into the atmosphere. It becomes a social issue when people in the area do not want this surrounding their homes. There is no One answer and no easy answers.
Other issues considered are:
" Watershed and erosion impacts
" Wildlife, when one species is protected what happens to other species in the area. One example was the spotted owl, when the area cutting was halted, the area burned in a high intensity fire started by lightning.
" Visual impact and smoke management must also be considered.
" Society values - part of society programmed to believe that cutting any tree is bad
In recent fires 5 % of Ponderosa Pines forests have been lost, forever because in high intensity fires the pines have no resilienency, meaning no habitat for 200 years in the future in an area. In ordinary fires the bark of the Ponderosa Pine protects it. It can live through many fires in this way.
On the positive side, many volunteer groups have had a valuable impact and there was an emphasis made on the role of involvement of the American public to know the issues, listen to different sides and then become a part of the care of public lands.
Doc Smith, from the Ecological Restoration Institute, shared slides of examples of healthy and unhealthy forests in preEuropean settlement days and today. He spoke of pioneer journals mentioning that they could ride through ranges with grass as high as the horses' bellies, driving wagons through the area and galloping horses over open areas. That couldn't happen today, the trees are too thick, with little space between each tree.

He gave us interesting statistics. Much of the information is on the website for the Ecological Restoration Institute. He then took us on a field trip so we could see first hand unthinned, moderately thinned and forests thinned to a natural state
Thank you Doc Smith for an eye-opening experience.

I love to see the passion in each one of the people that we have met that have a part in caring for our public lands. It is not just a job for most, but something they truly believe in. They want the public to know that decisions made are always in the best interest of helping the forest survive for a legacy for our children and our children's children, far into the future. Information chances over time, policies change in response.
I have much more information gleaned from this meeting that I hope to share as time goes on. We will also be using this information in presentations to school groups.



Part of the mission of the Trek is for the Trekkers to gather information to share with the American public on issues concerning public lands. Officials from different agencies and universities planned programs and have been eager for us to hear their stories, their views, their understanding of the care of public lands.
This morning we met at Northern Arizona University with Dennis Lund, retired forest service district ranger, as moderator. His opening comments reminded us that "What's happening today is the result of 100 years of policies". One of the biggest and most urgent issues is centered on Urban Interface problems, where families are moving into areas close to the forests and the danger of fires is paramount.
We heard from Jim Golden, Forest Supervisor for Coconina County, the second biggest county in the state of Arizona. His passion showed as he spoke about the complexities of management for forest health to prevent catastrophic events, to leave a legacy of healthy trees for future generations. With ever increasing size of fires in unnatural conditions ---"What do you do?". So many things come into play----science, economics, values, social issues, and politics. Combined, these can become a fire storm of their own. One scientific method would be to thin the forest, to resemble more natural conditions. It costs a considerable amount of money to accomplish this on 100,000 acres of land. Economically if a use could be found for the small logs harvested the project could help pay for part of the project. Sometimes the logs are burned; carbon is release into the atmosphere. It becomes a social issue when people in the area do not want this surrounding their homes. There is no One answer and no easy answers.
Other issues considered are:
" Watershed and erosion impacts
" Wildlife, when one species is protected what happens to other species in the area. One example was the spotted owl, when the area cutting was halted, the area burned in a high intensity fire started by lightning.
" Visual impact and smoke management must also be considered.
" Society values - part of society programmed to believe that cutting any tree is bad
In recent fires 5 % of Ponderosa Pines forests have been lost, forever because in high intensity fires the pines have no resilienency, meaning no habitat for 200 years in the future in an area. In ordinary fires the bark of the Ponderosa Pine protects it. It can live through many fires in this way.
On the positive side, many volunteer groups have had a valuable impact and there was an emphasis made on the role of involvement of the American public to know the issues, listen to different sides and then become a part of the care of public lands.
Doc Smith, from the Ecological Restoration Institute, shared slides of examples of healthy and unhealthy forests in preEuropean settlement days and today. He spoke of pioneer journals mentioning that they could ride through ranges with grass as high as the horses' bellies, driving wagons through the area and galloping horses over open areas. That couldn't happen today, the trees are too thick, with little space between each tree.

He gave us interesting statistics. Much of the information is on the website for the Ecological Restoration Institute. He then took us on a field trip so we could see first hand unthinned, moderately thinned and forests thinned to a natural state
Thank you Doc Smith for an eye-opening experience.

I love to see the passion in each one of the people that we have met that have a part in caring for our public lands. It is not just a job for most, but something they truly believe in. They want the public to know that decisions made are always in the best interest of helping the forest survive for a legacy for our children and our children's children, far into the future. Information chances over time, policies change in response.
I have much more information gleaned from this meeting that I hope to share as time goes on. We will also be using this information in presentations to school groups.

for Saturday, August 24
North South Both




Biographical
•
Team: South
Catherine Kiffe
A new look for the teachers lounge: Cathy K gets suited up to go riding the dual-sport motorcycles.
Cathy is a Homebound Teacher for students in grades Kindergarten through 12,...
   >> more...



List of All Journal Entries
•
Sunday, January 5
Catherine Kiffe
Public lands in Mississippi
   >> more...

•
Sunday, December 8
Catherine Kiffe
More Students Ask Questions
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, December 3
Catherine Kiffe
Student's Letter
   >> more...

•
Monday, November 25
Catherine Kiffe
Gifts from Long Ago
   >> more...

•
Sunday, November 10
Catherine Kiffe
Gray and Beautiful
   >> more...

•
Sunday, November 3
Catherine Kiffe
Using the Pictures
   >> more...

•
Friday, October 18
Catherine Kiffe
Rush, rush, rush
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, October 9
Catherine Kiffe
Home Again
   >> more...

•
Saturday, September 28
Catherine Kiffe
   >> more...

•
Friday, September 27
Catherine Kiffe
Together Again
   >> more...

•
Thursday, September 26
Catherine Kiffe
Packing Up
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, September 25
Catherine Kiffe
Across Strawberry Reservoir
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, September 24
Catherine Kiffe
The Last Hike
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, September 24
Catherine Kiffe
A Visit with Dinosaurs (or what’s left!)
   >> more...

•
Monday, September 23
Catherine Kiffe
Accident
   >> more...

•
Friday, September 20
Catherine Kiffe
Another Glorious Day on the trail.
   >> more...

•
Thursday, September 19
Catherine Kiffe
Roundtable---a place to learn
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, September 18
Catherine Kiffe
A thrilling ride!
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, September 17
Catherine Kiffe
Fishlake National Forest
   >> more...

•
Monday, September 16
Catherine Kiffe
Come for a 4 Wheel Drive
   >> more...

•
Sunday, September 15
Catherine Kiffe
Swirls
   >> more...

•
Sunday, September 15
Catherine Kiffe
Invasive Weeds
   >> more...

•
Friday, September 13
Catherine Kiffe
I Love This Land
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, September 11
Catherine Kiffe
Memorial Day
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, September 10
Catherine Kiffe
Special Day
   >> more...

•
Monday, September 9
Catherine Kiffe
How We Connect
   >> more...

•
Sunday, September 8
Catherine Kiffe
A Visit with Bill then hee,hee, hee
   >> more...

•
Saturday, September 7
Catherine Kiffe
Wilderness Explained
   >> more...

•
Friday, September 6
Catherine Kiffe
A River Ride and Dam View
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, September 3
Catherine Kiffe
   >> more...

•
Monday, September 2
Catherine Kiffe
Headlamps
   >> more...

•
Sunday, September 1
Catherine Kiffe
What's Roaring?
   >> more...

•
Saturday, August 31
Catherine Kiffe
The River
   >> more...

•
Friday, August 30
Catherine Kiffe
Beginning the Walk Down
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, August 27
Catherine Kiffe
Watch that Step
   >> more...

•
Monday, August 26
Catherine Kiffe
Passion and Information
   >> more...

•
Sunday, August 25
Catherine Kiffe
" Listen to All"
   >> more...

•
Saturday, August 24
Catherine Kiffe
Trees, more or less?
   >> more...

•
Friday, August 23
Catherine Kiffe
Dirt and Treasure and Sharing
   >> more...

•
Thursday, August 22
Catherine Kiffe
Be ready to change
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, August 21
Catherine Kiffe
Biscuits
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, August 21
Catherine Kiffe
Another Short Day
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, August 20
Catherine Kiffe
A Short Day
   >> more...

•
Monday, August 19
Catherine Kiffe
Questions
   >> more...

•
Monday, August 19
Catherine Kiffe
A Great Day
   >> more...

•
Saturday, August 17
Catherine Kiffe
A Scorched Land
   >> more...

•
Friday, August 16
Catherine Kiffe
What? 30 miles??? Yes!
   >> more...

•
Thursday, August 15
Catherine Kiffe
I Like It!
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, August 14
Catherine Kiffe
Life changing
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, August 13
Catherine Kiffe
Day "off"
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, August 13
Catherine Kiffe
Step Back In Time
   >> more...

•
Monday, August 12
Catherine Kiffe
Take A Deep Breath
   >> more...

•
Monday, August 12
Catherine Kiffe
A Little Bit of Water
   >> more...

•
Sunday, August 11
Catherine Kiffe
A Different Look At Burned Areas
   >> more...

•
Saturday, August 10
Catherine Kiffe
Take a Leap
   >> more...

•
Friday, August 9
Catherine Kiffe
Delightful Things
   >> more...

•
Thursday, August 8
Catherine Kiffe
Not a Buggy Ride
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, August 7
Catherine Kiffe
Ready for "hosses"
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, August 7
Catherine Kiffe
Roundtable
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, August 6
Catherine Kiffe
"Bag a Peak" and Fight with a Bush!
   >> more...

•
Sunday, August 4
Catherine Kiffe
Busy, busy!
   >> more...

•
Friday, August 2
Catherine Kiffe
Third Day of the Trek
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, July 31
Catherine Kiffe
4 Wheeling
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, July 30
Catherine Kiffe
Kickoff Events in DC
   >> more...

•
Tuesday, July 23
Catherine Kiffe
First day...
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, May 1
Catherine Kiffe
Public lands in Mississippi
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, December 31
Catherine Kiffe
More Student Questions
   >> more...

•
Wednesday, December 31
Catherine Kiffe
Gray and Beautiful
   >> more...








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