American Frontiers PLIADOIBLMUSDA FSGeography Action from NGSHondaColemanCoca-Cola
Search
About
Dispatches
The Trek
Exhibits
Lessons
Geo Action

PLIC Museum
Home

 Where Today...

•
Team: North
Friday, September 20, 2002
In the Wake of John Wesley Powell
View
City of Green River, Wyoming

City of Green River, Wyoming
Courtesy Bureau of Land Management, Wyoming State Office

View
Canoe Pull-out Near Horseshoe Bend of the Green River

Canoe Pull-out Near Horseshoe Bend of the Green River
Courtesy Bureau of Land Management, Wyoming State Office

View
Fishing for trout in the Green River

Fishing for trout in the Green River
Courtesy Bureau of Land Management, Wyoming State Office

Team North continues to paddle down the Green River today. As they pass Expedition Island in the town of Green River, Wyoming, they begin to follow the route that John Wesley Powell took on his first, historic journey down the Green River and the Colorado River. Tonight they will enjoy a presentation on this incredible adventurer and visionary.

On May 29, 1869, Major John Wesley Powell, a Civil War veteran who lost his arm, began the last great exploration of unknown territory in what later became the continental United States. Powell enjoyed a profound interest in botany, geology, and biology although he had little formal education. Ten men manned four awkward wooden boats not really suited for the long trip or the white water rapids to follow. Early accidents robbed the group of equipment and provisions. The explorers made their way down the Green past Flaming Gorge, which they named, to the confluence with the Colorado and into the Grand Canyon. Three men who left the party at the Grand Canyon were killed by Paiutes. Powell and five others completed the first exploration on August 30. 1869. In 1871, Powell made another trip down the Green River with more suitable equipment and provisions.

Although Powell is remembered primarily for his astounding explorations, he has shaped the West in other more important ways. He was appointed Director of the US Geological Survey, and began the long and arduous task of mapping the entire nation, a project completed long after his death. He was also the first to recognize the importance of water in the West, and fought to make settlements conform to water drainages rather than alloting homesteads randomly. He lost that fight, but the Bureau of Reclamation was later created after his model for water management.
for Friday, September 20
North South Both






TOP





All material copyright ©2002 - 2018, Public Lands Interpretive Association except photographs where ownership is otherwise indicated. All rights reserved.